Weekend Extras

Life feels hectic these days. I am constantly looking for shortcuts to make weekdays easier and weekends more relaxing. I find that spending some quiet hours around the house helps me recharge before the week.

As I mentioned, last week was a busy one. Weeknight entertaining plus weekend guests. When Sunday arrived, I was ready for some peace and quiet. I remembered that a bunch of frozen chicken bones were piling up in the freezer. It was the right time to make stock.

Chicken Stock

Although making stock takes a few hours, it mostly happens while you are doing other things. Perfect for my day of tidying, doing laundry, making shopping lists, and even just sitting. Making your own stock also saves time and money at the store. Plus it makes the house smell amazing!

Try it, I think you will be happy with the results. Start by saving the bones of whole chickens. (If they are raw bones, they will yield broth, and roasted bones will yield stock.) We eat a whole roasted chicken several times a month. I toss the uneaten parts in a zipper lock bag, put it in the freezer, and forget about it for a while. Or you can save the necks and backs you cut out of chickens. When you have 2-3 birds worth of bones, gather the other ingredients for the stock, including a large pot.

Stock Ingredients

At a minimum, you need 1-2 onions, 2-3 carrots, and several stalks celery. It's also nice to have leeks, parsley and thyme. A couple garlic cloves won't hurt either!

Place chicken bones in a large pot. Cover with water. Place pot over high heat and check back occasionally. When you see small bubbles, reduce heat to medium. You do NOT want it to boil vigorously. Also NO lid. Simmer chicken bones about 2 hours. During this time, check that the pot is simmering nicely (small bubbles). If you see any scum forming (off white/grey brown bubbles) scoop it off with a spoon.

TIP: Make sure you have enough water for the bones and veggies to "swim" comfortably.

Add veggies and continue simmering 1-2 hours. My picture demonstrates that I should have used a bigger pot. :-)

You can decide when the stock is done. Three to four hours is about right. Then strain the bits and pieces out (pressing to release tasty juices), cool at room temp before transferring to the frige. You want to use large shallow containers so that the stock cools quickly and safely. Then move to freezer storage containers (like the ones pictured). I get a bunch of these pint and quart containers and lids at Smart & Final. Just don't put anything hot in plastic containers...be patient and wait until it cools first.

So, yes, it's a process. But it yeilds delicious goodness that keeps giving back to you. It's safe in the frige for 2-3 days and will freeze for 6 months or longer. So, stock up! (Sorry I couldn't resist the pun)